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Indonesia Sumatra Coffee Beans: A Unique Coffee Experience

Indonesia Sumatra Coffee Beans is one of the largest producers and exporters of coffee in the world, and Sumatra is the most famous and popular coffee-growing region in the country. Sumatra coffee beans are known for their distinctive flavor profile, which is influenced by the climate, soil, processing, and roasting methods of the island. In this article, we will explore the characteristics, history, and varieties of Sumatra coffee beans, and give you some tips on how to brew and enjoy this unique and flavorful coffee.

What are Sumatra Coffee Beans?

Sumatra coffee beans are arabica coffee beans that are grown on the island of Sumatra, the largest island in Indonesia and the sixth-largest island in the world. Sumatra is located in the western part of the country, near the equator, and has a tropical climate with high humidity and rainfall. The island has a diverse landscape, with mountains, volcanoes, forests, and lakes, which create different microclimates and terroirs for coffee cultivation.

Sumatra coffee beans are typically grown at elevations between 2,500 and 5,000 feet above sea level, in the regions of Aceh, North Sumatra, West Sumatra, and South Sumatra. The coffee plants are mostly grown by smallholder farmers, who own less than one hectare of land and rely on traditional and organic farming methods. The farmers usually harvest the coffee cherries by hand, and then process them using a unique method called wet hulling, or giling basah in Indonesian.

Wet hulling is a process that involves removing the skin and pulp of the coffee cherries, fermenting and washing the beans, partially drying them, removing the parchment layer, and then fully drying them. This process reduces the acidity and increases the body and earthiness of the coffee beans, giving them a distinctive flavor and aroma. Wet hulling also helps the farmers to prevent the beans from spoiling in the humid climate, and to sell them faster to the market.

Indonesia Sumatra coffee beans are usually roasted to a medium or dark level, which brings out their complex and bold flavor. Sumatra coffee beans have a low acidity, a full body, a smooth mouthfeel, and a long finish. They have a rich and earthy flavor, with notes of chocolate, spices, herbs, nuts, and wood. Some Sumatra coffee beans also have a fruity or floral flavor, depending on the variety and origin.

What is the History of Sumatra Coffee Beans?

Sumatra coffee beans have a long and interesting history, dating back to the 18th century. Coffee was first introduced to Indonesia by the Dutch colonizers, who brought coffee plants from Yemen and India to Java, another island in Indonesia, in 1696. The Dutch East India Company (VOC) established coffee plantations in Java, and began to export coffee to Europe, where it became very popular and profitable.

In the early 19th century, the coffee rust disease wiped out most of the coffee plants in Java, forcing the Dutch to look for other areas to grow coffee. They found Sumatra, which had a suitable climate and soil for coffee cultivation, and started to plant coffee there in 1818. The Dutch encouraged the local farmers to grow coffee, and provided them with seeds, tools, and training. The Dutch also controlled the coffee trade, and set the prices and taxes for the coffee beans.

In the late 19th century, the Aceh War broke out between the Dutch and the Acehnese people, who resisted the Dutch colonization. The war lasted for more than 30 years, and disrupted the coffee production and trade in Sumatra. Many coffee plantations were destroyed, and many farmers fled or joined the resistance. The Dutch also faced competition from other countries, such as Brazil and Vietnam, which produced cheaper and more abundant coffee.

In the early 20th century, the Dutch introduced a new variety of coffee, called robusta, which was more resistant to diseases and pests, and had a higher yield and caffeine content. However, the quality and flavor of robusta coffee were inferior to arabica coffee, and the demand for Sumatra coffee beans declined. The Dutch also faced political and social unrest, as the Indonesian people fought for their independence from the Dutch rule.

In 1945, Indonesia declared its independence, and the Dutch finally recognized it in 1949. The new Indonesian government nationalized the coffee plantations, and gave them back to the local farmers. The farmers resumed the production and trade of Sumatra coffee beans, and adopted the wet hulling method, which suited their environment and preferences. The farmers also formed cooperatives, which helped them to improve their quality, quantity, and price of coffee.

In the 1970s, Sumatra coffee beans gained popularity in the international market, especially in the United States, where specialty coffee roasters and consumers appreciated their unique and flavorful characteristics. Sumatra coffee beans became one of the most sought-after and expensive coffees in the world, and earned a reputation as a gourmet and exotic coffee. Sumatra coffee beans also became the main ingredient of Starbucks’ espresso blend, which increased their exposure and demand.

In the 21st century, Sumatra coffee beans continue to be one of the most popular and respected coffees in the world, and one of the main exports of Indonesia. The farmers face some challenges, such as climate change, pests, diseases, and natural disasters, which affect their coffee production and quality. However, the farmers also receive support from various organizations, such as Fair Trade, Rainforest Alliance, and Organic, which help them to improve their social, economic, and environmental conditions, and to produce sustainable and high-quality coffee.

What are the Varieties of Sumatra Coffee Beans?

Sumatra coffee beans have three main varieties, which are named after the regions where they are grown: Gayo, Mandheling, and Lintong. Each variety has its own characteristics, which are influenced by the altitude, soil, climate, and processing method of the region.

  • Gayo: Gayo coffee beans are grown in the Gayo Highlands, in the Aceh region, near Lake Tawar and Lake Laut Tawar. The altitude ranges from 3,000 to 6,000 feet above sea level, and the soil is rich in volcanic minerals. The climate is cool and rainy, and the coffee plants are shaded by trees. Gayo coffee beans are processed using the wet hulling method, and are certified as organic and fair trade. Gayo coffee beans have a medium acidity, a full body, a smooth mouthfeel, and a long finish. They have a complex and balanced flavor, with notes of citrus, chocolate, caramel, spices, and herbs. Gayo coffee beans are considered to be the best quality and most expensive Sumatra coffee beans.
  • Mandheling: Mandheling coffee beans are grown in the Padang region, in the west-central part of Sumatra, near the port of Padang. The altitude ranges from 2,500 to 5,000 feet above sea level, and the soil is rich in clay and loam. The climate is warm and humid, and the coffee plants are exposed to the sun. Mandheling coffee beans are processed using the wet hulling method, and are certified as fair trade. Mandheling coffee beans have a low acidity, a full body, a syrupy mouthfeel, and a long finish. They have a rich and earthy flavor, with notes of chocolate, brown sugar, spices, and wood. Mandheling coffee beans are the most famous and popular Sumatra coffee beans, and are often used as a benchmark for other Sumatra coffees.
  • Lintong: Lintong coffee beans are grown in the Lintong region, in the north-central part of Sumatra, near Lake Toba. The altitude ranges from 3,000 to 5,000 feet above sea level, and the soil is rich in volcanic ash. The climate is cool and dry, and the coffee plants are shaded by trees. Lintong coffee beans are processed using the wet hulling method, and are certified as organic and fair trade. Lintong coffee beans have a medium acidity, a full body, a velvety mouthfeel, and a long finish. They have a sweet and spicy flavor, with notes of fruits, flowers, nuts, and wood. Lintong coffee beans are the most distinctive and flavorful Sumatra coffee beans, and are often preferred by coffee connoisseurs.

How to Brew and Enjoy Sumatra Coffee Beans?

Sumatra coffee beans are versatile and can be brewed using various methods, such as drip, pour over, French press, espresso, cold brew, and more. However, some methods are better suited than others, depending on the roast level, grind size, and personal preference of the coffee drinker. Here are some general tips on how to brew and enjoy Sumatra coffee beans:

  • Roast level: Sumatra coffee beans are usually roasted to a medium or dark level, which brings out their complex and bold flavor. However, some coffee drinkers may prefer a lighter roast, which preserves more of the acidity and fruity notes of the coffee beans. The roast level also affects the caffeine content of the coffee, with lighter roasts having more caffeine than darker roasts.
  • Grind size: Sumatra coffee beans are typically ground to a medium or coarse size, which allows for a longer extraction time and a fuller body. However, some coffee drinkers may prefer a finer grind, which results in a shorter extraction time and a stronger flavor. The grind size also affects the bitterness and sediment of the coffee, with finer grinds having more bitterness and sediment than coarser grinds.
  • Brewing method: Sumatra coffee beans can be brewed using various
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